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How Many Watts Does a Coffee Maker Use?

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You stumble into the kitchen, turn on your drip coffee maker, and wait for that life-giving coffee to brew. But have you ever wondered how much energy that appliance is using? Whether you’re trying to trim your energy bill, save the planet, or keep a finicky electrical system happy, it doesn’t hurt to know what your coffee maker wattage is.

Below, we’ll cover what wattage is, how many watts coffee makers use, and what it means for you. Get ready to save money on your daily brew!

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What exactly is wattage?

In case you’ve forgotten your high school science, wattage is a measure of electrical power, meaning how much power your electrical devices need to work. To calculate wattage, you multiply the volts by the amps. Amps are the amount of energy used and volts are the force of the energy. The good news is that — unless you want to — you don’t have to calculate this for yourself. Manufacturers advertise this information!

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The reason wattage is important is simple: your energy bill. Every time you turn on a light or plug in your coffee maker, you use energy, which the electric company adds up and bills you for. If you’re trying to reduce your energy bill and save money, kitchen appliances like your espresso machine are a great place to start!

What’s the most common coffee maker wattage?

Coffee maker wattage can vary widely because there are so many models on the market, all with different features and designs. If you have a basic small coffee maker, you can expect an energy level between 500 and 1200 watts.

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A small drip coffee maker (4 or 5 cups) typically uses 550 to 900 watts, while a larger model uses 750 to 1200 watts. A single-serve brewer that uses coffee capsules (like a Keurig or Nespresso) uses 900 to 1500 watts of power. And an automatic espresso machine uses between 1000 and 1500 watts.

Keep in mind that any coffee maker that can keep water hot — allowing you to brew quickly whenever you want — will use at least 60 watts an hour just maintaining that water temperature. Unless you turn the machine fully off, you’ll be paying for that electricity — even though you probably don’t need it most of the time.

What about specific brands?

Here are the energy ranges for common coffee maker brands. If you want to know the wattage of a specific model, we recommend checking the specs on your machine’s user manual. If you’ve misplaced yours, you should be able to find a copy on the company’s website.

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Keurigs use between 200 and 400 watts of energy to keep the water hot. They peak at about 1500 watts when in full brewing mode. In comparison, a 12-cup Mr. Coffee uses a more modest 900 watts.

Nespresso machines use over 1000 watts. For example, the VertuoNext uses 1260 watts, whereas the CitiZ uses 1710.

How much does this cost?

According to Energy Star, the average drip coffee maker uses 100 to 150 kWh of energy a year. The US average cost per kWh is 13.19 cents, meaning you’d spend between $13 and $20 a year powering your coffee maker. That doesn’t sound like much, but it does add up if you have a lot of other appliances.

Can you make coffee without using any electricity?

cowboy coffee on the campfire
Image: Jarno Holappa, Shutterstock

You certainly can, but not using a drip coffee maker. Try using a gas stove or a campfire to heat water for electricity-free brewing methods like pour-over or French press. You can also skip the heat entirely by making cold brew — provided you can wait 18 hours for your coffee. Read our full guide to brewing coffee without electricity!

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The Bottom Line

So how many watts does a coffee maker use? If you have a drip machine, you can expect between 500 and 1200 watts. That averages about 125 kWh a year, or $16 on your energy bill. Your coffee maker probably isn’t the biggest energy-user in your house, but it can still be a good place to economize.

If you’re curious about your specific model’s wattage, check the user manual. You may be surprised by your coffee maker wattage!

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Kate MacDonnell

Kate is a lifelong coffee enthusiast and homebrewer who enjoys writing for coffee websites and sampling every kind of coffee known to man. She’s tried unusual coffees from all over the world and owns an unhealthy amount of coffee gear.

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